Artisan, Virtuoso and The Golden Ratio

EDCI 672 Instructional Design Final Project
Genevieve Munden Graduate Sudent
Purdue University

The objective of this project is to make the connection between an artisan and virtuoso which I did by merging the background composition, “Brilliant Ideas” by Marco Belloni with the artisan, by Borovikk.

Item Title: Uplifting Inspiring Piano Brilliant Idea Item URL: https://elements.envato.com/uplifting-inspiring-piano-brilliant-ideas-NCZV3PU Item ID: NCZV3PU Author Username: marcobellonimusic Licensee: Genevieve Munden Registered Project Name: EDCI 672 License Date: November 24th, 2019 Item License Code: N8WHZU3ETQ Video Clips obtained from Envato: By Borovikk Video Editing: Genevieve Munden

The music is complex yet wonderous, as the artisan conceives the idea by opening with a small material vase followed by sketches that he will use to bring it to life. Playing with the idea of the ‘Golden Ratio’ on his wheel, the artisan gives the audience a hint to his level of expertise. The clay is kneaded to remove any obstacles, as air bubbles would certainly destroy the ever-growing work of art, at any phase of its growth. On the wheel, it seems like a large mound of ‘nothing,’ much like the beginning thoughts that often challenge us. It is heavy, shapeless, and thick.

Wrapping hands gently around his concept, he molds it upward with each stroke, almost as if to make it lighter, with a more refined and dedicated shape. ‘Pulling the walls’ is a critical phase, as too many will collapse the idea in a second. Three is the magic number. The first pull starts the ascent. The second gives the maximum height while the third provides the initial shape.

 

 

 

 

With the help of a stick, the last pull brings it to life, forming the slender and graceful neck with a final tweak at the end to shape the mouth. Using the flaming torch allows for ‘Rapid Fire’ so he can continue faster to the next phase of shaping and bending the upper body slightly inward for a unique shape … a style, a signature. The neck is formed, followed by carving and decoration before subjecting it to the final fire that will solidify his plan, his work of art.

The expert uses this methodology with purposeful intent to create a masterpiece, allowing very little room for error. It is a straightforward, yet meandering path, a ‘complex simplicity,” the art and skill of making the complex simple. The virtuoso in the background is skilled in much the same way, merging the artisan with the seemingly magical sound.

As an Instructional Designer, you must trust your methodologies to take you to places you never dreamed of. Think outside the box and wonder “Could this idea be possible?” Challenge yourself with wonderous ideas and make your concepts come to life, and you will wake up one day and see an expert designer in the mirror. Wake up the artisan and virtuoso in everything you do so all can benefit! Dare to make things different! You will amaze yourself! “I am not a genius.

I have no special talent. I am just passionately curious.”
~ Albert Einstein